Jun 18, 2021  
2019-2020 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Policy



Privacy of Student Records and Release of Information

Saint Francis University recognizes that the protection of the rights of persons requires adherence to clearly formulated institutional policies governing the maintenance of student records. The privacy and confidentiality of all student records shall be preserved. University faculty and staff are bound to respect the rights of a student to privacy by holding in confidence information they acquire in the course of their work.


The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: (1) the right to inspect and review information contained in the student’s education records; (2) the right to request amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA; (3) the right to provide written consent before the University discloses personally identifiable information from the student’s education record, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent; and (4) the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education.


Students who wish to have their educational record released to parents or third parties (any individual or organization other than the student or a Saint Francis University official) must complete a student information release authorization form available on my.francis.edu. A third party who seeks the release of a student’s educational record is responsible for obtaining the student’s permission for that release.


The complete Privacy of Student Records and Release of Information policy is available in its entirety, in the Student Consumer Information section of the University’s website.
 

Grading System

A student’s scholarship rating in each subject is determined by the combined results of examinations and class work. For this purpose the following grading scale will be used.

Grades may be modified with “+” and “-” designators, indicating levels of performance that rank between the letter-grade definitions provided below. “Plus” and “minus” designators adjust the quality-point value of letter grades according to the formula described below.

A Superior command of subject matter and exemplary performance in virtually all course requirements (e.g., examinations, written assignments, projects, oral presentations, class participation). Comprehensive mastery of factual information and demonstration of superior ability in critical thinking.
B - Highly developed command of subject matter. Consistently high level of performance in most course requirements, exceeding the instructor’s expectations. Substantial mastery of factual information and highly developed ability in critical thinking.
C - Fundamental command of essential subject matter. Satisfactory performance in most course requirements. Basic mastery of factual information, and demonstrated ability in critical thinking.
D - Substantial deficiencies in command of subject matter. Minimal performance in several of the course requirements. Marginal fulfillment of course objectives.
F - General failure to understand the subject matter. Unsatisfactory performance in many or most course requirements. Disqualifying deficiencies in ability to master basic factual information.
FF - This grade is used for students who fail a course due to habitual absenteeism. An instructor who assigns a grade of “FF” is required to document the habitual absenteeism by reporting the student’s last day of attendance in that class prior to the onset of two weeks of unexcused absence from a class that follows a conventional fourteen-week semester schedule. That formula will be applied proportionally to compressed classes that meet according to different schedules.
I - Incomplete. This grade is to be used when the student has failed to complete all course requirements by the end of the semester. The grade of “I” may be used at the discretion of the instructor, but no instructor is required to extend this option to students. Each instructor should explain his or her policy on the grade of “I” to each class at the beginning of each semester.

The grade of “I” is intended for use in cases when small amounts of course work remain to be completed. Instructors must complete an “Incomplete Grade Form” for each “I” grade given, stipulating what work must be completed. The form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office, and a copy of the form will be sent to students after grades are recorded. A student receiving this grade must submit the required work to the instructor not later than 14 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester (summer sessions included); the instructor must submit a letter grade to the Registrar not later than 21 days following the beginning of the subsequent semester. Any “I” that is not replaced by a letter grade by that time will be changed automatically to the grade of “F.”

CN - Continuing. This grade is used when unusual circumstances make it difficult or impossible for a student to complete course work by the end of the semester.

A “CN” grade may be used only when the student initiates the process by obtaining a “CN” contract from the Registrar’s Office. In this contract, the student, the instructor, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs must agree to both the intended date of completion and the specific nature of the assignment to be completed. Once the contract is agreed upon, it must be submitted to the Registrar. The Registrar will not accept “CN” grades which are not accompanied by an appropriately signed and dated contract.

Assignments not completed by the deadline date as shown on the contract will cause the course grade to be registered as “F”.

W - Withdrew after the drop/add period and prior to the deadline for withdrawal.
AD - Took course for no credit.
IP - Course in progress
NR - Grade not reported by instructor. 

“NR” is not intended to be a permanent entry on the student’s transcript.  The “NR” will default to “F” seven days following the deadline for the submission of final grades if the instructor does not replace it with a letter grade.

NG - Not a graded course

Grades of “A, B, C, D, F, W, and AD” are entered on the student’s permanent academic record. Grades of “A, B, C, D, and F” are used to compute the student’s grade point average (G.P.A). The G.P.A. is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of credits taken for grade.

Each letter grade earns quality points as described in the example provided below. “Plus” and “minus” modifiers are authorized only for the A-, B+, B-, and C+.

  Grade Point Value   Course Credits Quality Points
    A 4           x 3 12
    A- 3 2/3 x 3 11
    B+ 3 1/3 x 3 10
    B 3 x 3 9
    B- 2 2/3 x 3 8
    C+ 2 1/3 x 3 7
    C 2 x 3 6
    D 1 x 3 3
    F 0 x 3 0
               27 66
           

The G.P.A in this example is 66/27 = 2.444

Mid-semester and semester grade reports are available online to students through the campus network. No grade reports will be available for students who have outstanding financial obligations to the University.

Pass-Fail Grading Option

Selected courses may be taken for a “Pass-Fail” grade. The Pass-Fail option may not be used for courses which the student is required to take or for prerequisites for those required courses. Other regulations concerning the Pass-Fail option follow:

  • The Pass-Fail option is not available to Freshmen.
  • One Pass-Fail course may be taken in any given semester of the Sophomore, Junior and Senior years. However, every candidate for graduation must earn a minimum of 112 credits that are graded using the “A through F” grading scale.
  • Students must inform their advisors and the Registrar of their intention to register for a course on the Pass-Fail basis prior to the final Drop-Add date.
  • Faculty members are not informed about students electing the Pass-Fail option. Faculty are to grade all students on the “A through F” scale. The Registrar will convert the grade to Pass or Fail on the final grade confirmation sheet and the transcript.
  • Students registering for a Pass-Fail course will receive either a “P” for Pass or “F” for Fail on their academic transcripts. Failing grades will be used to compute the G.P.A.

Grade Appeals

If a student wishes to question or appeal a grade, the student will, prior to the sixth week of the subsequent fall or spring semester:

Contact the instructor for an explanation of the grade determination. The instructor of the course will review how the grade was determined. If a grade change is warranted, instructor will complete and submit a grade change request.

If not satisfied with the grade and explanation, the student will then appeal to the department chairperson or director of the academic program sponsoring the course. The chairperson/director will review the grade determination with the course instructor, and then meet with the student to explain the outcome of the appeal. Some departments/programs have published appeal policies that must be followed.

A student who remains unsatisfied with the results of the appeal must, prior to the end of the sixth week of the subsequent Fall or Spring semester, submit a letter of appeal to the appropriate dean. The letter must include a summary of the meetings with the instructor and the appeal results, as well as a rationale for the appeal. After discussing the appeal with the instructor and the department chairperson/program director, the dean will meet with the student to explain the final decision. In cases where the dean is the course instructor, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the final appeal.

Auditing Classes

Students who wish to take courses for their information only may choose to audit the classes. The courses will appear on the transcript with a grade of “AD” and will not count toward any semester or cumulative totals. Students must specify on their registration forms which courses they are auditing and must pay the audit fee (one-half tuition) if tuition is being determined on an individual course basis. Students may not audit courses which are required for their degrees.

Academic Advising

The primary purpose of an academic advising program is to assist students in the development of meaningful educational plans which are compatible with their life goals. At Saint Francis University, academic advising is viewed as a continuous process of clarification and evaluation. The Center for Academic Success, located in Scotus, works in conjunction with the academic advisor and the student to help support educational needs and goals. The office is open to all students as an additional and/or supplemental academic resource.

Individual academic advising conferences are available to students each semester. The advisor will review and utilize any available data about the student’s academic and educational needs, performance, goals, and problems. The ultimate responsibility for making decisions about life goals and educational plans rests with the student. The advisor will assist by helping to identify and assess alternatives and the consequences of decisions.

As part of the University’s First Year Experience Program, entering freshmen students are assigned to advisors when the students participate in the Summer Orientation and Academic Registration (SOAR) Program during the summer prior to their freshman year. The advisors work with students during the freshman year. At the end of the freshman year, or in some cases later, students declare an academic major where the department chair serves as advisor or assigns an advisor from the department’s faculty.

Saint Francis University’s goals for academic advising are as follows: clarification of life and career goals; development of suitable educational plans; selection of appropriate courses and other educational experiences; interpretation of institutional requirements; increase student awareness of available educational resources; evaluation of student progress toward established goals; development of decision-making skills, and referral to and use of other institutional and community support services where appropriate.

For students who need additional help from someone beyond their assigned academic advisor, appointments are available at the Center for Academic Success in St. Francis Hall.

Academic Honors

Honors are awarded to Saint Francis University undergraduate students in recognition of their academic accomplishments.

Students who earn a semester grade point average of at least 4.00 are named to the President’s List.  

Students who earn a semester grade point average of at least 3.50 are named to the Dean’s List.  

The President’s List and the Dean’s List are announced every semester.  No President’s List or Dean’s List designation will be awarded for a particular semester until all “CN” and “I” grades (except students in Independent Study or Honors 444) for that semester have been removed from the student’s academic record.    

Part-time students enrolled at Saint Francis University will be eligible for the designation, “Academic Honors in Continuing Studies,” if they have completed a minimum of 15 credits between September 1 of one year and August 31 of the following year. Such students must achieve at least a 3.5 grade point average on all Saint Francis University courses taken in the particular year. These students must carry a part-time status throughout the year. A part-time student who enrolls full-time (12 credit hours) in a particular semester (excluding summer sessions) forfeits the opportunity to earn “Academic Honors in Continuing Studies.” Such a student, however, is automatically eligible for the Saint Francis University President’s List or Dean’s List during the semester in which he or she is enrolled as a full-time student. In such a case, the student would have to attain the grade point average as required for the respective honors award on at least 12 credit hours of coursework taken during one semester.

The Saint Francis University Honor Society is comprised of those students who have met the following qualifications: (a) completion of the freshman year; (b) maintenance of overall quality point average of 3.5 or better; (c) attainment of the Dean’s List or President’s List at least once; (d) no “F” grade in any course; (e) approval of the Chief Academic Officer.

Degrees with honor are conferred by the University for exceptional scholastic achievement at Saint Francis University, subject to the following considerations: 1) one or more semesters spent abroad or in Washington, D.C., as part of a degree program offered by Saint Francis University shall be considered as study at Saint Francis University; 2) one or more semesters spent at cooperating hospitals as part of the University’s Medical Technology or Podiatric Science programs shall be considered as study at Saint Francis University; 3) in the case of students who accelerate their program, honors shall be computed on the basis of total courses taken at Saint Francis University; 4) no student is eligible for academic honors who has not completed at least 64 credits of his or her course work at Saint Francis University. The degrees with honors are as follows: Cum Laude for a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5; Magna Cum Laude for a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.7; Summa Cum Laude for a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.9. Students enrolled in degree completion programs in the Adult Degree & Continuing Studies division who have completed at least 48 credits at Saint Francis University with a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 3.50 are eligible for the designation of “Honors in Continuing Education.”

A student whose Independent Study project has been judged by the Independent Study Committee to be of outstanding quality is recognized with Departmental Honors. Departmental Honors are posted in the Commencement program and on the student’s academic transcript. 

Class Standing

  1. To attain sophomore class standing: 28 credits
  2. To attain junior class standing: 60 credits
  3. To attain senior class standing: 96 credits

Academic Standing

Academic standing is based on semester and cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) on all Saint Francis University courses once a student has attempted at least 12 credits. The grade point averages determining good academic standing, academic warning, academic probation, and academic dismissal are established to provide students with a clear understanding of their responsibilities during their college careers. All credits listed are attempted.

Good Standing: 30 or fewer credits Cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.800
  31-59 credits Cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.900
  60 or more credits Cumulative G.P.A. at or above 2.000
     
Warning: 30 or fewer credits Semester G.P.A. below 2.0, and cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.800
  31-59 credits Semester G.P.A. below 2.0, and cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.900
  60 or more credits Semester G.P.A. below 2.0, and cumulative G.P.A. at or above 2.000
     
Probation: 30 or fewer credits Cumulative G.P.A. below 1.800
  31-59 credits Cumulative G.P.A. below 1.900
  60 or more credits Cumulative G.P.A. below 2.000
     
Dismissal:   Cumulative G.P.A. less than 1.000

Students placed on academic probation are required to participate in a structured study laboratory program entitled Study Acceleration: Gaining Excellence (SAGE). SAGE consists of supervised study periods, individual tutoring, skills workshops, and self-assessment under the direction of University faculty and staff. Students are limited to 12 credits per semester while they are on academic probation.

Students on academic warning, while still in good standing, will be reviewed by the Academic Standing Committee where recommendations will be made as to possible credit limitation, required SAGE hours, the addition of a study skills course, and/or other requirements.

Students who are on warning or probation at the end of spring semester are encouraged to attend summer semester at Saint Francis University and raise their cumulative G.P.A. to that required for good standing. Students’ academic standing may change as the result of summer semester courses.

Academic dismissal will occur:

  • When student’s cumulative G.P.A. is less than 1.000;
  • After two consecutive probationary semesters (excluding summer semester); or
  • If students on academic probation do not participate in SAGE, as required and do not achieve academic good standing by the end of the semester.

After the first academic dismissal, students may appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If the appeal is granted, students may return to the University for the next semester (fall, spring, or summer). If the appeal is denied, students may not apply for readmission for at least one calendar year, at which time the readmission request must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs upon the recommendation of the Academic Standing Committee. When students return from academic dismissal, they are on academic probation, and additional stipulations may be specified.

Students who have been away from the University for at least five years after a second dismissal may apply for readmission at that time. Their application would be presented to the Vice President for Academic Affairs who will consult the Academic Standing Committee for a recommendation and then make a decision.

Academic Honesty

A. Introduction

Academic honesty is an essential part of the Saint Francis University experience. Dishonesty in any aspect of the life of the University is viewed as being incompatible with the school’s moral tradition. Accordingly, Saint Francis University has prepared a policy on academic honesty that will guide students in dealing with such issues in the process of learning regardless of course delivery method.

B.   Policy Statement

The Franciscan tradition of Saint Francis University holds that students maintain honesty in all intellectual and academic pursuits, which means they will present as their own only work they have created. In addition, all material must be properly attributed to the original author or source. This includes always conducting oneself with integrity and honesty in all University business. Examples of violations to this policy are outlined in Section C.

All Saint Francis University students will be expected to understand what academic dishonesty is and the associated implications by reviewing the policy and examples provided. It is the responsibility of the chief academic officer and faculty to provide the appropriate information to facilitate familiarity with potential violations of academic integrity among all Saint Francis University students. To ensure that students are familiar with this policy, the policy will be reviewed during student orientation sessions.

C. Violations of Academic Honesty

There are various practices that are seen as violations of academic honesty. Examples of these, listed below, were developed by the University of Rochester (2011) and are used with permission. Additional examples of violations of academic honesty are based upon a list of unacceptable practices that was provided by Dr. John Watson of St. Bonaventure University. These examples are not intended to be exhaustive.

1. CHEATING  

Including, but not limited to undertaking any activity intended to obtain an unfair advantage over other students; using unauthorized notes or other study aids during an examination; using unauthorized technology during an examination, including laptop computers, cell phones, e-readers or others; improper storage of prohibited notes, course materials, and study aids during an exam such that they are accessible or possible to view; looking at other students’ work during an exam or in an assignment where collaboration is not allowed by the instructor; attempting to communicate (verbally, nonverbally, or via technology) with other students or persons in order to get help during an exam or in an assignment where collaboration is not allowed by the instructor; improper obtaining (including photographing) or distributing of an examination; altering graded work and submitting it for re-grading; submitting another student’s paper or project as one’s own; submitting work done in one class for credit in another without the instructor’s permission; coaching another student in the preparation of an assignment in part or in-whole, including editing papers, projects, computer programs, etc., unless specifically assigned by the instructor; discussing exam content from one section of a course with students from a different section who have not yet taken the exam; someone other than the students completing the assignment or exam.

2. PLAGIARISM

Using whether deliberate or unintentional,  an idea, phrase, or other materials from a source without proper acknowledgment of that source (electronic or other) in work for which the student claims authorship, including direct copy/paste from online or print sources without using quotation marks; inadequately or incorrectly documenting source materials; misrepresenting sources used in a work for which the student claims authorship; improperly using course materials in a work for which the student claims authorship; using papers purchased or obtained online or through other means and turned in as one’s own work; submitting written work, such as laboratory reports, computer programs, or papers, that has been copied from the work of other students, with or without their knowledge and consent. *The risk of plagiarism can be avoided in written work by clearly indicating, either in footnotes, in-text citations, or other accepted methods, the source of any major or unique idea or wording that you did not arrive at on your own. In addition, the majority of any written work should consist of the original ideas of the student. When material is directly copied from a source, the material must appear in quotes to show that the wording is not the student’s own.  Sources must be correctly cited regardless of whether the material is quoted directly, summarized, or paraphrased.

 3. FABRICATION

Falsifying or inventing any information, citation, or data; using improper methods of collecting or generating data and presenting them as legitimate; submitting contrived or altered data, quotations, or documents with an intent to mislead; or deliberately misattributing material to a source other than that from which the student obtained it; misrepresenting oneself or one’s status in the University; perpetrating hoaxes unbecoming to students in good standing or potentially damaging to the University’s reputation or that of the members of its academic community of students and scholars.

4. FACILITATING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Aiding another person in an act that violates the standards of academic honesty; allowing other students to look at one’s own work during an exam or in an assignment where collaboration is not specifically allowed by the instructor; providing information, material, or assistance to another person verbally or by electronic means knowing that it may be used in violation of course, departmental, or University academic honesty policies; providing false information in connection with any academic honesty inquiry.

5. DENYING OTHERS ACCESS TO INFORMATION OR MATERIAL

Any act that maliciously hinders the use of or access to library or course materials; such as the removal of pages from books or journals or reserve materials, the removal of books from libraries without formally checking out the items, the intentional hiding of library materials, and the refusal to return reserve readings to the library. All of these acts are dishonest and harmful to the University community.

6. FALSIFYING RECORDS AND OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS

Forging signatures or falsifying information on official academic documents (paper or electronic), such as drop/add forms, incomplete forms, petitions, letters of permission, or any other official University document, is considered a violation of policy. Knowingly making false statements or presenting false evidence at any time throughout the academic honesty process is as well. In cases where the student has been accused of other unacceptable practices, knowingly making false statements or presenting false evidence will be treated as an additional offense for purposes of determining the proper penalty category.

D.  The Judicial Process for Violations of Academic Honesty

1. The Role of the Faculty

The faculty of Saint Francis University are obliged to play a major role in the implementation of an effective academic honesty policy. Accordingly, when a member of the faculty becomes aware of a possible incident of academic dishonesty, that faculty member must question the alleged offender and impose a penalty if the situation warrants.

Members of the faculty have several initial penalty options for academic misconduct:

a.  Assignment of a failure for the course.

b.  Assignment of a failure on the specific assignment.

c.  Lowering of a letter grade by one or more letters.

d.  Suspension from the class for one class period.

 

The accusing instructor must then write an incident report outlining the offense and the nature of the penalty levied. The report will be handled in the following manner:

a. The report will be sent to the Office of the Registrar, where it will be filed for a period of five years, unless the student is still enrolled at Saint Francis University. If this is the case, records will be destroyed when the student graduates or otherwise separates from the University.

b. A copy of the incident report will be forwarded to the Office of Academic Affairs (See “Appeals: First Offenses”). When a student is accused of dishonesty, it will be the responsibility of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to determine whether the student is a multiple offender. If this is the case, the student will move through a different appeal process than will first-time offenders. (See “Appeals: Multiple Offenses”)

c. Within 10 days of the report, the accused student will be given written notice of the violation and assigned consequences. At this time, the student will have 5 days to file an appeal.

2. Appeals
a. Appeals: First Offense

Saint Francis University believes in fairness for all of its students and faculty. It provides due process for any of its students who have been accused of a breach of academic honesty. Thus, a student who does not agree with the penalty imposed by the faculty member may appeal directly to the Academic Court.

If a student rejects the decision of the Academic Court, he or she may elect to appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. This officer of the institution will be the court of last resort at Saint Francis University.

A record of each student’s appeal process will be documented by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and placed on file in the Registrar’s Office.

b. Multiple Offenses

In all cases where a student has been accused of a violation of academic trust, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will certify the honesty status of that student. This means that the Vice President for Academic Affairs will examine the files held by the registrar and indicate whether the student has previously broken the academic honesty policy.

A multiple offender, before actual dismissal, must appear before the Academic Court. Unless the student in question can present a compelling case, he or she will be dismissed from Saint Francis University immediately. The student may apply for readmission after a period of one year.

If the student rejects the action taken by the Academic Court, he/she will have the right to appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. This officer may reduce the student’s sentence or uphold the penalty imposed by the Academic Court. The Vice President for Academic Affairs may not add to the sentence.

3. The Academic Court

The Academic Court at Saint Francis University is an important element in the academic appeals process. The body will consist of five members plus two alternates.  Two of the members will be students appointed by the President of the Student Government Association. Three other members of the court will be full-time faculty appointed by the President of Saint Francis University. The Chair of the Academic Court will be elected by colleagues on the court. He or she must be a member of the teaching faculty. The Bylaws of the Academic Court are listed in Section E.

4. Records

All records pertaining to each case of academic dishonesty will be kept on file in the Office of the Registrar. These records will include the following:

a.    The written record of the professor regarding the initial penalty.

b.    The written record of the student’s appeal to the Academic Court and the

      decision reached by that court.

c.    A review of the case by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Bylaws of the Academic Court

1. Membership

a. Membership on the court equals five, plus two alternates. One alternate will be a student appointed by the President of the Student Government Association. The second alternate will be a faculty member appointed by the President of Saint Francis University.

b. A quorum consists of the full membership of the court.

c. Three members of the court will be full-time faculty appointed by the President of Saint Francis University.

d. Two members of the court will be students appointed by the President of the Student Government Association.

e. Student members must at least have achieved junior status by the beginning of their first semester on the court.

f. The Chair of the Academic Court will be elected by colleagues on the court for a one-year term at the beginning of each academic year.

g. Each year, the Academic Court will elect a secretary for a one-year term.

h. To establish the faculty representation on the court, the President of Saint Francis University will appoint one faculty member to a one-year term, a second to a two-year term, and a third to a three-year term. After the establishment of the court, the President of Saint Francis University will  

  each year elect one member of the full-time faculty for a three-year term.

i. To establish student representation on the court, the President of the Student Government Association will, for the first year, appoint one junior and one senior to the court. In each of the following years, the President of the Student Government Association will appoint one junior student for a two-year term of office.

j. Records of the Academic Court shall be kept in the Office of the Registrar.

k. The Chair of the Academic Court (or designee) will have access to the records of the court.

2. Proceedings

a. The student accused of violating the Academic Honesty Policy will have the opportunity to provide clarification to and answer questions from the Academic Court. Arrangements for the student to speak with the Court shall be made by the Office of Academic Affairs during the designated meeting time. Phone conferencing or another alternative is permissible if the student is off campus.

b. The faculty involved will be invited to discuss with the Academic Court, separately from the student involved. Such arrangements shall be made by the Office of Academic Affairs. Phone conferencing or another alternative is permissible if the faculty is off campus.

c. No guests are permitted to speak on behalf of the student or faculty member or to observe Academic Court proceedings. Proceedings of the court may not be recorded using any electronic means. The elected secretary of the Academic Court will take minutes during the proceedings.

d. Athletic status may not be considered as part of deliberation or decision-making.

e. Previous incidents of academic dishonesty involving the student involved should not be considered. Each case should be considered independently and objectively.

f. The Academic Court should take the opportunity to consider all possible information regarding the incident to gain a thorough understanding of the situation prior to voting. A preponderance of evidence should be present to uphold the incident of academic dishonesty.

g. All proceedings of the Academic Court are confidential.

h. The Academic Court will ensure that all parties to an appeal action appear before it.

3. Voting

a. Once discussion has ended, the Chair of the Academic Court will call for a vote.  The Chair will pass out ballots to vote on whether or not the Court believes a violation occurred. Majority vote will determine if a violation occurred.

b. If the majority vote does not indicate a violation, the report is dismissed. All ballots and notes regarding the proceedings should be collected and returned to the Office of Academic Affairs. A summary of the proceedings and vote results should be provided by either the secretary or chair to the Office of Academic Affairs as soon as possible after the conclusion of the hearing.

c. If the majority vote does indicate a violation, then further discussion should occur regarding the penalty levied on the student. The Academic Court may rule to lessen the penalty rendered by the faculty member involved, however the Academic Court may not rule to make the penalty more severe. The Court may offer various recommendations based on a case-by-case basis in consideration of the student’s situation. All ballots and notes regarding the proceedings should be collected and returned to the Office of Academic Affairs. A summary of the proceedings and vote results should be provided by either the secretary or chair to the Office of Academic Affairs as soon as possible after the conclusion of the hearing.

d. Final appeal may be made to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who makes the final decision for the Academic Court.

Matriculation

A full-time undergraduate student is one who is registered for 12 credits or more per semester.

A part-time undergraduate student is one who is registered for 11 or fewer credits per semester.

A matriculated student is one who is a candidate for a degree; matriculated students may, in consultation with their academic advisors, work toward a degree on a part-time basis.

A non-matriculated student is one who is not a candidate for a degree. Non-matriculated students may enroll on a full-time or part-time basis with the approval of the Vice President of Enrollment Management, who may grant matriculated status to qualified non-matriculated applicants.

Once a student has matriculated at Saint Francis University, all courses in the major must be completed at Saint Francis University. Likewise, it is expected that all collateral courses will be completed at Saint Francis University. Applications for exception may be directed to the Registrar.

General Requirements for Graduation

The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees are conferred by the University only at commencement. The program of study leading to each degree is usually completed in eight semesters of full-time enrollment. To qualify for graduation, a student must have followed a program of study approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, completed a total of at least 128 credits, and have repeated for an acceptable grade any course in the major field in which the grade of “F” has been received.

Students are required to follow the course curricula as stated in the Saint Francis University catalog in effect at the time of the student’s entrance into the University or when the student declares a major. A student who wishes to follow a curriculum, in its entirety, adopted after that time, must file a Policy Waiver Request Form available at the Registrar’s Office. A student wishing to follow parts of both the old curriculum and the new curriculum must file a Course Waiver Substitution Form for each new course.

A candidate for any degree must complete the last 30 credits at Saint Francis University. Upon the recommendation of the appropriate department chair, specific individual cases requesting a waiver of this regulation may be given consideration by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Every candidate for a degree must make formal application for the degree at least one semester before the graduation date. Proper completion of the official Application for Degree form, obtainable on My.Francis student portal, constitutes formal application.

Candidates for a degree must be present at the annual commencement exercises to receive their diplomas in person. To participate in commencement, a student must have completed all requirements for the appropriate degree or, if the student is within six (6) credits of completing degree requirements (or within two courses of completing degree requirements, not exceeding eight credits) and has at least a 2.0 cumulative and major grade point average, must apply in writing to the Registrar for permission to attend commencement ceremonies. Permission to participate in commencement exercises may be granted if the student is able to demonstrate that the remaining credits will be completed during the subsequent summer session(s).

The requirements for a baccalaureate degree are completion of 128 or more credits (as outlined in the remaining sections of this publication) with a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at Saint Francis University, and a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.00 or better in all major and collateral requirements, and fulfillment of General Education: Ethical Citizenship for the 21st Century (2012-Spring 2019)  requirements.

Registration

Registration is held for current students at an announced date preceding the end of each semester. Incoming freshmen are registered during the summer months immediately preceding the opening of the semester.

Students have complied with registration requirements when they have their schedule of studies approved by their advisor, when they have registered for their courses, and when they have completed arrangements for the payment of their semester accounts.

Students must register for a Saint Francis University course before or during the semester in which the course is taken. Students may not register for a course later than seven calendar days after the first scheduled class meeting of the fall or spring semester or three calendar days after the first scheduled class meeting of a summer session. In no case will credit for a course be awarded retroactively.

No student is considered enrolled in a class until the student’s name appears on the official class list.

The University reserves the right to cancel any course on the basis of insufficient enrollment.

Registration in Graduate Courses by Undergraduates

Undergraduate students are permitted to register for graduate-level courses with permission of their advisors and the director of the graduate program offering the course, but no graduate course taken by an undergraduate student in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an undergraduate degree may later be used to fulfill the requirements of a graduate degree.

This restriction does not apply to a graduate-level course that is completed by an undergraduate student as a free elective beyond the 128 credits that are required for an undergraduate degree.

Schedule Changes

Students wishing to add or delete a course must access the web-based registration program to make changes to their schedules. Students should consult academic advisors for approval of the changes to class schedules prior to adding or dropping courses. Changes of schedule may be made through the seventh day of the semester. In order to add variable-credit courses (including but not limited to internships, Independent Study, and applied music tutorials), students should contact the Office of the Registrar for instructions.

Course Waivers and Substitutions

Students may request course substitutions or waivers for documented equivalent learning in consultation with their academic advisor. These requests require approval from the appropriate academic administrators. Students may obtain the proper forms online at My.Francis.Edu

Academic Attendance

Saint Francis University is committed to helping students achieve their goals. To ensure that the desired learning outcomes are achieved in your academic programs and to promote individual behavior patterns that are congruent with success in school and in life, the University has developed a policy regarding class attendance and participation.

Class Attendance Regulations

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they are registered as part of their academic obligation. Instructors have no obligation to provide make-up opportunities for an absence unless, in their judgment, the reason for the absence warrants such consideration or is a University approved absence, as defined in the next section.

Every instructor maintains a record of attendance and determines how absences will affect a student’s grade, as explained in the course syllabus. If  a student is absent excessively from class, the course instructor will report those absences to the Center for Academic Success who in turn will contact the student’s advisor. Once reported, effort will be made to intervene with the student to resolve any reasons the student might have for not attending class. The student’s parents may be contacted after the Center for Academic Success and the student’s advisor have a conversation. The University attempts to maintain a safe, positive, and nurturing atmosphere to help every individual student succeed. If, after intervention, the student continues a pattern of chronic absenteeism, then he or she will be subjected to immediate dismissal from the University.  If a student is dismissed for attendance issues, the student must sit out for the period of one entire semester after the semester of dismissal (semester includes fall or spring).

Students reporting late for class may be denied admission by the instructor and reported as absent.

After the final class enrollment lists have been processed, students may attend any class for which they are not registered if the instructor gives permission and if the course does not conflict with the student’s regular schedule of courses.

Absence from Class

Students who are ill and must be absent from class, you should notify their instructor(s) directly.  The following absences from class are considered approved by the university:  military obligation, hospitalization, medical absence due to a documented disability, and athletics participation.

Students needing to miss class for military obligation, hospitalization, or medical absence due to a disability, should notify their instructor(s) directly and contact the director of the Center for Academic Success for official notification distribution. For consideration of a University approved absence, you need to present appropriate verification.

Prolonged absence from class can eventually create academic problems for any student.  Whether or not all other absences not included in this policy will be excused is determined by the faculty member.

Course Load

A full-time load  for undergraduate students is 12 to 18 credits. With the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, students may take up to 21 credits, provided that they have a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 3.0 or that they are seniors who need the extra credits for graduation. Students are responsible for additional tuition charges when enrolling for more than 18 credits in a semester.

Winter Break Course Load

A limited number of courses may be offered during the winter break, the three week period between the fall and spring semesters. A full course load during the winter break period shall be 6 credits.  With the approval for the Vice President for Academic Affairs, students may request additional credits provided that they have a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 3.0 or that they are a senior who needs extra credits for graduation.

Full-time Status

An undergraduate student who is enrolled for twelve or more semester hours of credit is considered a full-time student.  A graduate student who is enrolled for nine or more semester hours of credit is considered a full-time student.

Credit-By-Examination

Certain Subject CLEP (College-Level Examination Program) examinations, which have been approved by the appropriate department chair, are recognized for the purpose of course fulfillment and credit at Saint Francis University.  Any individual is eligible to take a CLEP examination.  An individual who achieves a qualifying score on a particular examination will receive credit for the course corresponding to that examination. In the absence of local norms, the recommendations of the Center for Academic Success will be followed in determining a satisfactory score. The optional essay section of the CLEP is required by the history department at Saint Francis University.

Courses satisfied by means of the CLEP will be listed in a student’s file and total credits earned will be recorded on a student’s transcript under the heading “Credit-by- Examination.” Taking the CLEP will not affect a student’s option for P-F grades in that the student will still be entitled to the maximum number of P-F course grades allowable. A student may fulfill a maximum of 30 credits by means of Advanced Placement and/or College Level Examination Program examinations for a bachelor’s degree and 15 credits for an associate’s degree. A student may substitute a free elective in place of a course requirement satisfied by examination and a student who satisfies a course requirement by examination will not be charged tuition for that course.

CLEP exams may be taken at any CLEP test site. All information regarding CLEP test registration is available at clep.collegeboard.org.  A student will not be entitled to receive credit for a lower-level course after having taken a higher-level course. This holds true even if the student has failed the higher-level course. For example, a student who has taken Spanish 201 cannot receive CLEP credit for Spanish 102 .

Arrangements for taking an examination may be made by contacting the individual test site.  Saint Francis University test center code number is 2797.  The student must request an official score report be sent to Saint Francis University in order to be evaluated for credit.  More information regarding CLEP is available in the Testing Center (814-472-3287, cas@francis.edu).

   
 

CLEP Examinations Approved by Saint Francis University

 

CLEP Examination

Corresponding Course at Saint Francis University
 

Accounting, Financial

ACCT 101 Financial Accounting  
 

Algebra, College

MATH 107 - College Algebra  
 

American Goverment

PLSC 102 - American National Government  
 

Analyzing & Interpreting Literature

LIT 104 - Introduction to Literature   

 

Biology BIOL 101, General Biology  
 

Business Law, Introductory

BLAW 301, Legal Environ of Business  
 

Calculus

MATH 121 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry I , MATH 122 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry II  
 

Chemistry

CHEM 113 - Human Chemistry I  
 

Educational Psychology, Introduction 

EDUC 150 - Educational Psychology  
 

French Language
German Language
Spanish Language

Can receive up to 12 credits in French.
German and/or Spanish at SFU, depending upon the score of the Elementary and Intermediate levels
 

History of the United States I: Early Colonizations to 1877 (subject and essay) +

HIST 103, The U.S. to 1877  
 

History of the United States II: 1865 to the Present (subject and essay) +

HIST 104, The U.S. Since 1877  
 

Information Systems and Computer Applications

CPSC 101, Introduction to Comp Systems  
 

Macroeconomics, Principles of

ECON 101 - Principles of Economics I  
 

Marketing, Principles of

MKTG 302, Marketing  
 

Management, Principles of

MGMT 101 - Principles of Management  
 

Microeconomics, Principles of

ECON 102 - Principles of Economics II  
 

Psychology, Introductory

PSYC 101, Introduction to Psychology  
 

Sociology, Introductory

SOC 101, Introduction to Sociology  
 

Western Civilization I:  Ancient Near East to 1648 (subject and essay) +1

HIST 101, Europe and the World to 1815  
 

Western Civilization II:  1648 to the Present (subject and essay) +2

HIST 102, Europe and the World Since 1815  
 

 

 
 

+ Exam can be taken a maximum of two times
1 Essay covers material from 1500 to 1815.
2 Essay covers material from 1815 onward.

 
 

Withdrawal from Class

A student may officially withdraw from class no later than the 49th day of classes for the semester. To do so, a student must obtain a withdrawal form from My.Francis, obtain the signatures of the instructor and the student’s advisor, and submit to the Office of the Registrar. If approval is given, the student will receive a grade of “W.” Remission of tuition and/or fees will be made in accordance with institutional policy.

Withdrawal after the 49th day subjects a student to an “F” grade. If a student can show just cause (illness or family emergency), the student may, in consultation with the instructor, apply for a grade of “CN” or “I” for any course from which he or she withdrew. If such arrangements are not made by the student, the “F” grade will apply. As usual, the “F” grade in this instance is calculated in the student’s grade point average.

Suspensions from Class

In keeping with the University’s policy on academic honesty, a student apprehended for dishonesty during a class meeting may, at the discretion of the instructor, be suspended indefinitely from the class. Such a suspension is recorded on the student’s official transcript as an “F.” A second offense may result in dishonorable dismissal from the University.

A copy of the academic honesty policy is published in Student Handbooks and is available for review on the My.Francis student portal.

Final Examinations

Final examinations must be administered in accordance with the final examination schedule prepared each semester by the registrar.

Instructors are urged to administer a formal final examination on the day and time included in the final examination schedule prepared each semester by the registrar. In courses where major papers, lab practica, seminar presentations, or other large projects constitute a major portion of the semester’s work, such assignments may be substituted for final examinations. These assignments should be due near the end of the semester.  Furthermore, the classes must continue to meet for the full semester, even after these assignments are submitted.

Faculty should inform students of final examination policies on the first day of classes and include the format and schedule for the final examination in the course syllabus.

A final examination is to be given at the time published in the final exam schedule.  Final examinations cannot be moved, even with consent of the class and the instructor, once the semester begins.  The final exam schedule provides options for multiple section examinations; course faculty may schedule several sections during a common time by contacting the registrar prior to the start of the semester.  In the event that an examination is moved to a multiple-section time slot, students with a conflict at that time may petition their instructor for an alternative examination time.

If a student has more than two final examinations scheduled on the same day, the student may petition her/his faculty to request that an exam be moved.  These decisions are at the discretion of the faculty.  An instructor may give a student permission to take a final examination with another section of the same class at the instructor’s discretion.

A student absent from a final examination due to serious illness, or an equally grave reason, may have his or her examination deferred. Students who are absent from a final examination for the above stated reasons will receive a grade of CN (Continuing) or I (Incomplete).  Student completion of the final exam, and faculty submission of the resulting letter grade for the course, will then follow standard procedures for Incomplete grades, or the stipulations put forth on the Continuing grade contract submitted by the faculty member and student (see “Grading System” policy). 

Complaints about the application of final examination procedures may be made by a student to the chair of the department. Issues that could reasonably have been anticipated based on policies set forth in the syllabus or other written notice by the instructor should be addressed prior to the administration of the exam. Concerns that arise during the actual administration of the exam may be made no later than one week into the subsequent semester.  Appeals of the chair’s decision may be made to the school dean.  The decision of the dean is final and is not subject to appeal.

Faculty members shall keep on file, and make available upon request by the chair, graded final examinations during the following regular semester. They shall review a graded final examination with a student, if so requested, on an appointment basis, unless it is a standardized exam protected by the usage policies of an outside institution. Faculty members who will be absent from the University during a regular semester shall file examinations in the department chair’s office and shall designate a colleague who shall have access to them for consultation with students.

Comprehensive Examination

All students must pass a comprehensive examination in their major field of study as a requirement for graduation. The purpose of the examination will be to assess the student’s command of the material and methodology used in his or her major.

Students who pass their comprehensive examination will be automatically registered for EXAM 401, Comprehensive Exam, or EXAM 402, Comprehensive Exam With Distinction, and a grade of “P” will be recorded. The non-credit requirement will not affect the student’s cumulative grade point average, and there will be no additional fees charged to the student.

Writing Competency

All-undergraduate students must demonstrate the ability to write a clear, developed, and organized essay as a requirement for graduation. This requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing the Writing Competency Exam-which is given in the junior year, by completing WRIT 199, Argumentative Writing, with a grade of C or better, or by successfully completing CORE 199, Senior Intensive Writing Workshop.

Students will be automatically enrolled for EXAM 301 upon achieving junior status (60 credits). The Writing Competency Examination is graded “P” or “F” (pass/fail)  with an alternative grade of “HP” (high pass”) for students whose performance on the examination is especially meritorious.  No additional fees are charged for this non-credit requirement, and the grade for the Writing Competency Examination does not affect a student’s grade point average. 

Students who have not passed the WCE or completed ENGL 199 with the grade of C or better by the first semester of their senior year (or by the first semester after earning 96 credits), will automatically be enrolled in CORE 199.

Internships

Saint Francis University conducts a program of internships designed to introduce an experiential element into a student’s plan of studies. Saint Francis University students have interned in a variety of settings, from radio and T.V. stations to accounting firms, to the U.S. White House, gaining experiences relevant to their fields of study.

Students desiring an internship should contact their academic advisor or the department chair to begin planning for the internship experience. A student may present no more than 15 hours of internship credit toward graduation requirements and no more than nine hours of internship credit for the major.

All students must complete an associated project, a study, or essay related to the internship. This project will be divided into two categories (graded credits with a 398 course number and pass/fail credits with a 399 course number) as follows:

  Total Credits Graded Credits (398) Pass/Fail Credits (399)
  1 - 5 1 0 - 4
  6 - 10 2 4 - 8
  11 - 15 3 8 - 12


Students will be required to keep a daily log or journal as part of the project grade and are required to read a book pertinent to the internship setting, writing a brief review of the book as seen from the perspective of the internship.

All Saint Francis University internship sites will be visited by the supervising Saint Francis University faculty member at least once during the semester that the internship is being offered.

Independent Study

To be eligible for Independent Study, a student, at the end of three full semesters, must be in “good standing” as that phrase is defined in the University catalog. Before enrolling for an Independent Study course, students must discuss the proposed project with their faculty sponsor and secure the approval of the department chair for the project.

Change of Major

Undergraduate students may request that their major be changed or a major be added as long as approval is given from the receiving department chairperson and dean. The Change of Major form is available online at My.Francis.Edu. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain all necessary signatures prior to returning the completed form to the Office of the Registrar. The student’s program of study in the new major will be governed by the Saint Francis University catalog in effect when the change of major process is completed.

Students should be aware of departmental entrance criteria for the major in which they are interested and must understand that there is no guarantee of admission into the new major.

Second Bachelor’s Degree

A candidate for a second bachelor’s degree who previously had been awarded a bachelor’s degree must complete a minimum of 32 credits in residence which have not counted toward the first bachelor’s degree, and must satisfy the requirements of a major other than those taken for the first bachelor’s degree. These students will not be eligible for academic honors for the second bachelor’s degree, unless the candidate completes at least 48 credits at Saint Francis University pursuant to completion of the second bachelor’s degree.

Saint Francis University undergraduate students who are seeking their first bachelor’s degree, and desire to complete two majors, one involving the Bachelor of Arts degree and the other the Bachelor of Science, must complete the requirements of each degree program.

General Regulations for Academic Minors

  1. All courses used to fulfill minor requirements must be graded with the regular letter grades of “A-D.” Pass-Fail grades are not permissible.
  2. A cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.0 must be earned in the courses used to fulfill minor requirements.
  3. An “F” grade in the discipline of the declared minor must be removed even if that course is not included in the minor requirements, unless the chair of the minor discipline were to determine that repetition of the failed course would be impossible or impractical.
  4. No more than six credits of the minor requirements may be fulfilled by an independent study project, an internship, practicum, fieldwork or similar activity.
  5. At least half of the credits for a minor must be completed at Saint Francis University.

Transfer of Credit- Undergraduate

Saint Francis University welcomes students at the undergraduate level who have earned college credits prior to matriculation. The University recognizes the experiences and achievements individual students have gained. Academic advisors and counselors will guide individual students to maximize their learning opportunities in a flexible, supportive environment. Accordingly, this transfer credit policy describes the many opportunities individual students have to complete a Saint Francis University degree or credential and include credits or experiences completed elsewhere.

Scope:  

This policy applies to students formally accepted and enrolled in an undergraduate program or a postsecondary or post-baccalaureate certificate program at Saint Francis University.

Policy Statement:

New and readmitted students who are formally accepted and enrolled in an associate or bachelor degree program, or a post-secondary or post-baccalaureate certificate program, may request transfer of credit for relevant courses previously completed at regionally-accredited post-secondary institutions. Transfer credits are also considered on a case-by-case basis from post-secondary institutions nationally accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Transfer credits will be awarded based on the similarity of course outcomes, rigor, content, length, and practical experiences where applicable. The transfer of credit must be completed in the student’s first semester and is subject to the approval of the relevant academic department chair, dean, the associate vice president for academic affairs, and the regulations of the Saint Francis University academic program in which the student is enrolled.

Procedures to Request Transfer of Credit:

New, transfer or readmitted students must provide official transcripts to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies at the time they apply for admission. Students are responsible for providing any course descriptions or syllabi that may be requested for accurate evaluations to be made. Students may request transfer of credit from other institutions attended or sources such as College in High School, Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and armed forces course equivalencies prior to their first semester.

Matriculated students who wish to take a course at another institution and transfer credits to Saint Francis must:

  • Obtain permission from the chair of the department offering the original course prior to enrolling in the course. Students will discuss the plan of study with their academic advisor prior to submitting the “Transfer Request Form” and the “Course Evaluation Form” available online at my.francis.edu. Granting of transfer credits requires the written approval of the relevant academic advisor or department chair, the relevant academic dean, and the associate vice president for academic affairs. Transfer credit will not be guaranteed if the student fails to obtain approval prior to taking the course.
  • Be in good academic standing at Saint Francis University. Good standing is defined as:
    • 30 or fewer credits attempted – cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.800
    • 31-59 credits attempted – cumulative G.P.A. at or above 1.900
    • 60 or more credits attempted – cumulative G.P.A. at or above 2.000

A student not in good academic standing will not be authorized to enroll in courses at other institutions.

  • Assume full responsibility to have the transfer institution provide an official transcript sent directly to the Saint Francis University Office of the Registrar immediately upon completion of the course.

General Qualifications for Transfer Credit:

  • Relevant courses with grades of “C” or better (2.0 on 4.0 scale) completed at regionally-accredited post-secondary institutions will be considered. Transfer credits are also considered on a case-by-case basis from post-secondary institutions nationally accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.  (Courses with grades of “C-” that carry 2.0 quality points on a 4.0 scale may be considered.)
  • Courses will be considered for transfer on a course-by-course basis. Applicability to the degree for which a student is a candidate and comparability to an existing Saint Francis University course may be used as factors for the acceptance or denial of transfer credit.
  • Transfer credits are not used in the computation of the student’s grade point average at Saint Francis University. Credits transfer, grades and quality points do not.
  • Transfer courses cannot be a major or collateral requirement for matriculated students (except those enrolled through the Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies). Exceptions to this policy may be considered for matriculated students using the transfer credit form available on my.francis.edu.
  • Transfer credits cannot be earned for courses already attempted and completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Courses completed toward post-secondary certificate and diploma programs can be considered for transfer.
  • Internships or practicum, developmental, review or remedial courses are not transferable.
  • A course for which no credit is given at the original institution cannot be transferred for credit at Saint Francis University. However, the Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies may consider training completed for certification, workplace requirements, or other specialized training (e.g., continuing education units or CEUs) for conversion into academic credit for transfer toward a post-secondary or post-baccalaureate certificate or undergraduate degree if the training has been evaluated according to the ACE Guidelines, reviewed by the National College Credit Recommendation Service (CCRS), and does not duplicate credit already accepted in transfer. Eligible CEUs and specialized training hours are converted via a formula that considers 14 hours of training/education to equal a single academic credit hour.
  • Students who, upon admission, transfer 28 or more credits including a two-semester, six-credit sequence in college-level English composition classes (excluding Advanced Placement and CLEP credits) will be exempt from ENGL 103, Writing for a Discipline.
  • Students, upon enrollment, may transfer a successfully completed research-based writing course from an accredited college or university in lieu of ENGL 103. (This does not include College in High School courses.)
  • Except by permission of the appropriate department chair, RLST 105 or RLST 205 must be completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Transfer institutions outside the United States must be recognized as degree granting institutions by their home country. A course-by-course evaluation of all foreign university transcripts by an independent service based in the United States is required for international transfer students.
  • Transfer credits become applicable to a Saint Francis University degree program or certificate program only after the student has been admitted as a degree-seeking student or admitted to the certificate program.

Limitations:

  • Bachelor’s Degree: At least 64 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University for a student to be eligible for a bachelor’s degree, except those students studying for a second bachelor’s degree (see Second Bachelor’s Degree policy) or enrolled in a degree completion program through Adult Degree and Continuing Studies (ADCS). The last 30 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Degree Completion Programs: Students enrolled in a degree completion program through Adult Degree and Continuing Studies may transfer up to 98 credits to Saint Francis University. The last 30 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree: At least 27 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University. A maximum of 9 credits (combination of transfer courses and credits by means of credit by examination, e.g., AP, CLEP, IB) will be accepted for transfer in addition to 27 credits awarded in a prescribed technical curriculum from the partner institution.
  • Associate of Science Degree: At least 33 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University. A maximum of 30 credits (combination of transfer courses and credits by means of credit by examination, e.g., AP, CLEP, IB) will be accepted for transfer. The last 18 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Post-secondary Certificate Program: At least 15 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University. A maximum of 15 credits (combination of transfer courses and credits by means of credit by examination, e.g., AP, CLEP, IB) will be accepted for transfer. The Post-secondary Business Certificate program requires at least half of the business core requirements to be completed at Saint Francis University.
  • Post-baccalaureate Certificate Program: At least 15 credits must be completed at Saint Francis University. A maximum of 9 credits (combination of transfer courses and credits by means of credit by examination, e.g., AP, CLEP, IB) will be accepted for transfer (except for the Early Childhood Education Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program which accepts up to 30 transfer credits.)

Credit by Examination:

Saint Francis University offers several credit by examination options such as Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Credit earned by examination may be used to satisfy requirements in the same manner as the college courses which the tests replace or as the academic department concerned might specify. Credit earned by examination will not be awarded for the same course more than once. Equivalencies and other requirements for the credit by examination options are outlined in the University’s Credit by Examination policy.

Military Credit:

Saint Francis University uses the American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services to assess how to transfer military credits to Saint Francis. In general, military courses must be similar to a Saint Francis undergraduate course and applicable to an undergraduate degree program to transfer to Saint Francis.

Students seeking to transfer military credits to Saint Francis University should request their official transcript from Joint Services Transcript (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) or the Community College of the Air Force (Air Force).

Articulation Agreements:

The University has established articulation (transfer) agreements with other institutions to encourage and facilitate transfer for students from other institutions to Saint Francis University. Such agreements are administered by the Office of Academic Affairs. Articulation agreements may include transfer course guides. Any exceptions to other University academic and administrative policies are addressed in the articulation agreement. The University’s current articulation agreements are provided on the University’s web site.

Conversion of Credit:

U.S. colleges and universities that operate on a quarter system award quarter credit. Saint Francis University operates on a semester system and awards semester credit. To convert credit hours from the quarter system to the semester system, multiply the number of quarter hours by 2/3 (or .67).  For example, 3 quarter credit hours would be converted to 2 semester credit hours (3 x .67 = 2).

Transfer Credit Appeal:

For newly enrolled students, initial transferability decisions are made by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or the Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies. The Center for Academic Success and First-Year Experience facilitates the transfer credit process for returning enrolled students. Any questions about policy or individual transfer credit evaluations should be directed to the appropriate office. 

If a student wishes to challenge the Transfer of Credit policy or the application of the policy, then the appeal must be submitted in writing to the appropriate office listed above (i.e. Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies, or Center for Academic Success and First-Year Experience). The director will examine the appeal to determine if the policy was appropriately applied to yield the initial evaluation. When challenging a course equivalency, the student may be asked to provide a course syllabus which gives more detail than a catalog description. The appeal will be denied when it is determined that the policy was appropriately applied. An appropriate correction will be issued if the policy was misapplied. Appeals denied by these offices may be appealed to the Vice President for Academic Affairs who will issue a final decision.

  • Center for Academic Success and First-Year Experience: (814) 472-3024
  • Office of Undergraduate Admissions: (814) 472-3100
  • Office of Adult Degree and Continuing Studies: (814) 472-3012
  • Office of Academic Affairs: (814) 472-3004

Transfer of Saint Francis University Courses to Other Institutions:

Saint Francis University cannot guarantee that its courses and credits will transfer to other institutions. The transfer of courses and credits is determined by the receiving institution.

Transfer of Credit - Graduate

Students who are formally accepted into a graduate program and registered for courses may request transfer credit for relevant graduate courses completed at regionally accredited institutions, including courses taken at SFU while enrolled in another graduate program, whether or not a master’s degree was awarded.

Credits taken prior to the term of graduate admission and used to satisfy program requirements are considered transfer credits. Transfer of graduate credit is subject to the approval of the Program Director, the Dean, and to the regulations of the SFU academic program in which the student is enrolled.

Transfer credits are awarded only for courses: 

  • completed within five years to the date of admission to the SFU graduate program. (The Graduate Education department considers transfer of credit for courses completed within seven years to the date of admission.)
  • completed at a regionally accredited institution in the United States or an officially recognized degree-granting international institution
  • comparable in content and rigor to the SFU course.

These are general guidelines. It remains at the individual program’s sole discretion whether or not to grant approval for transfer of credit.

Additional limitations:

  • A maximum of six graduate-level credits may be transferred.
  • Credits for courses in which the student earned a grade below B (3.0) or received a non-letter grade such as a pass/fail are not transferable.
  • Courses used as part of a previously completed bachelor’s program may not be transferred.  The Graduate Nursing program will not accept transfer credits from any previously earned degree. 
  • Grades in courses transferred from other institutions, or from a prior master’s degree program completed at SFU, will not be calculated into the student’s grade point average (GPA).
  • SFU will not accept transfer credits titled as “workshops.” Each transfer request is evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
  • Academic credit cannot be awarded for life or military experience, or previous work experience.
  • Transfer institutions outside the United States must be recognized as degree granting institutions by their home country. A course-by-course evaluation of all foreign university transcripts by an independent service based in the United States is required for international transfer students.
  • The MOT, DPT, MPAS, DPT/MBA, and MMS programs do not accept transfer credits at the graduate level.

Procedures:

Below are the steps involved in processing transfer course work for graduate students:

  • Students must provide official transcripts from any previous institution(s) to the graduate program director.
  • Students must provide a “Transfer of Credit Request” form for consideration of credit transfer no later than the end of the first enrolled semester. Students are responsible for providing any course descriptions or syllabi that may be needed for accurate evaluations to be made.
  • Granting of transfer credits requires the written approval of the Program Director of the relevant program and the Dean of the relevant school. The Program Director completes and signs the “Transfer Credit Evaluation” form, and forwards it to the Office of the Registrar.

Students may repeat any course, subject to the restrictions specified below. Courses in which “F” grades are earned may be repeated only at Saint Francis University. Both the original course and grade, and the repeated course and grade, appear on the academic record, but only the higher grade is used in the computation of the G.P.A. A course which is a prerequisite for a more advanced course in the same discipline may not be repeated after a more advanced course has been successfully completed.

Repeating Courses

Students may repeat any course, subject to the restrictions specified below. Courses in which “F” grades are earned may be repeated only at Saint Francis University. Both the original course and grade, and the repeated course and grade, appear on the academic record, but only the higher grade is used in the computation of the G.P.A. A course which is a prerequisite for a more advanced course in the same discipline may not be repeated after a more advanced course has been successfully completed.

Change of Name or Address

The Registrar is to be informed immediately of the change of a student’s home address and/or change of a student’s name.

Withdrawal from the University

It is recommended that students contemplating withdrawal from the University first discuss this question with their academic advisor. If students decide to withdraw, the Office of Career Services is available to assist them in clarifying and reaching their future goals. Information and counseling are available regarding transferring to other institutions as well as assistance in reaching new occupational objectives.

Withdrawal Procedures

Students who need to withdraw from Saint Francis University are required to complete an official withdrawal form from the Center for Academic Success (CAS). This form will then be signed by the director of CAS (or designee) and sent to various offices at the University. The official withdrawal process includes the completion of the official withdrawal form, clearing of all financial obligations, and returning the laptop.

Students considering withdrawal from the University should be aware that they are subject to the regulations governing withdrawal from courses. Therefore, if students withdraw from Saint Francis University after the official date for dropping a course, they will receive a grade of “F” for all courses carried that semester. If a student can show just cause (illness or family emergency), the student may in consultation with the instructor, apply for a grade of “CN” or “W” for any course from which he or she withdrew. If such arrangements are not made by the student, the “F” grade will apply. As usual, the “F” grade in this instance is calculated in the student’s grade point average.

If a student requests a leave of absence for the semester or year, he or she will complete the official withdrawal process. When the student is ready to return to the University, he or she will contact the Office of Admissions and request to reactivate their studies. Any student who withdraws from the University may request to be re-admitted by contacting the Office of Admissions.

Please refer to “Financial Information” and “Refunds” for information on financial refunds in the case of withdrawals.

 

Withdrawal Procedures Due to Military Service

Students called to active duty as reservists should provide a copy of their military order to the Registrar. Copies of this order will be forwarded to the Business Office, Office of Financial Aid, and the Office of Veterans Affairs.

Students who request a full semester withdrawal will receive a full refund of tuition and fees. Any University room/board contract fees would be refunded on a pro-rated basis for the actual services the student has received up to the date of the withdrawal.

If a substantial part of the semester has been completed at the time the student receives deployment orders, the student may make arrangements with faculty to complete his/her academic responsibilities for the semester and apply for a “CN” grades according to the procedure described in the University catalog. Room and board will be pro-rated as mentioned above.

Students who receive a University-issued laptop computer are required to return the computer at the time they leave to fulfill their military obligation.

Students who complete their active military duty and request re-admission to the University will be automatically re-admitted with all admission fees waived. The student’s academic standing at the time of re-admission shall remain as it was prior to the call to active military duty.

This policy also includes military dependents whose families must move due to redeployment and/or relocation.

Transcript Service

Saint Francis University understands the importance of providing our students with effective and efficient transcript services. A new career, entrance to Graduate School, professional certification, or other important events depend on the prompt and secure delivery of your transcript. We also understand the need to protect the privacy of student transcripts and our obligations under Federal law.

Saint Francis University provides twenty-four hour access to online transcript ordering through a secure website. The online ordering service is available to current, former students, and alumni.  The service can be accessed from the My.Francis portal and the University website. Applicable transcript service fees apply, most major credit cards are required.

Requests can also be submitted by mail, and the printable request form for this type of order can be found on the University website. Transcript orders should be accompanied by a check or money order to cover transcript  fee for each transcript sent. The following personal data is required: full name of student as it appeared in University records when last enrolled at Saint Francis; current address; date of last attendance at the University; whether attendance was as an undergraduate, graduate, or College in High School, and whether the student graduated or not.  Current students can also access their unofficial transcript online at My.Francis.Edu

No transcript will be issued for students who have outstanding financial obligations to the University.

Federal Law requires the current or former student’s signature in order to release academic records. A consent form must be completed and returned before the request can be processed. Consent forms for online orders can be signed electronically, faxed or scanned, and emailed. Smart phone users can take and send a picture of the signed consent. Request by mail also require a signed consent. The order form used to request transcripts by mail requires an original signature and must be mailed in. This type of order and consent will not be accepted via telephone, email, or FAX.

Institutional Review Board

Saint Francis University has established an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to review all research involving the use of human subjects and to implement institutional policies and procedures regarding such research. The use of human subjects in research imposes both ethical and legal responsibilities upon the University, the project directors, and those conducting the research to ensure that the rights and welfare of those subjects are adequately protected. The primary function of the IRB is to assist researchers in the protection of the rights and welfare of human subjects. Review and approval by the IRB is meant to aid both the subjects and the researchers by objectively assessing the potential risk and accommodations made to minimize the risk within the study.

All research involving the use of human subjects conducted by Saint Francis University faculty, staff, or students, or sponsored in part or in whole by Saint Francis University must be reviewed and approved prior to the start of the project and then conducted in full compliance with applicable IRB policies and procedures. Research is defined by federal regulations as a systematic investigation including research development, testing, and evaluation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. It encompasses work which is conducted on or off campus and includes questionnaires, interviews, surveys, tests, observations, and other experiments, even if the work is preliminary to a more extensive study. It includes secondary analyses of data previously collected. It also includes any systematic collection of data from human subjects that occurs in conjunction with classroom projects, unless the work is done as a learning exercise for the student and will never be published or presented outside the course.  The IRB can be accessed at http://info.francis.edu/institutional-Review-Board/

Definitions of Semester Length, Credit Hour, Instructional Time Equivalencies

To comply with our regional accreditation organization and government regulations, Saint Francis University establishes semester and credit hour definitions.

The regional accrediting organization, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, suggests that universities establish “expected learning outcomes that are consonant with the standards of higher education and of the relevant disciplines”; and provides “direct evidence of student learning; and assessment results that provide sufficient, convincing evidence that students are achieving key institutional and program learning outcomes.”

“These definitions are provided as a reminder to institutions. They are not Commission requirements, and an institution may demonstrate in alternative ways that academic offerings are of appropriate academic content, breadth, length, and rigor, provided that it also demonstrates compliance with all applicable government policies, regulations, and requirements.”

(http://msche.org/documents/Degree-and-Credit-Guidelines-062209-FINAL[1].pdf)

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in The Pennsylvania Code, Title 22 Education in Chapter 31 General Provisions in Subchapter 31.21 Curricula, provides the following guidelines:

(a) The curricula must provide the opportunity for the achievement of the stated objectives of the institution, as related to its statement of philosophy and mission, and must be structured in a group of coherent, integrated degree programs.

(b) Degree requirements stated in this section may be stated in terms of semester credit hours or quarter credit hours, as determined by the institution and conforming to generally accepted academic practices. General education, as defined in this section, refers to the curricular inclusion of humanities, arts, communications, social sciences, mathematics, technology and science courses in support of the mission of the institution. A semester credit hour represents a unit of curricular material that normally can be taught in a minimum of 14 hours of classroom instruction, plus appropriate outside preparation or the equivalent as determined by the faculty. ..

(c)  To assure academic integrity, an institution shall provide students in a distance education program access to academic and student services, including textbooks, study guides, library and other learning resources, personal interaction with faculty, tutors or other educational personnel by computer, telephone, mail or face-to-face meeting The institution shall assure integrity of student work and provide opportunity for student assessment.

And, the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations, Part 600 Institutional Eligibility Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, As Amended, provides a definition of credit hour. Credit hour: Except as provided in 34 CFR 668.8(k) and (l), a credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than–

1.  One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or

2.  At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hour

I.  Traditional Semester Format

The traditional semester will consist of 14 full weeks of classes followed by a week of final examinations. The University considers a 50 minute class to be the equivalent of one hour of instruction. Courses on a Monday/Wednesday/Friday schedule will meet 42 times for 50 minutes, and for a final examination, providing a total of 44 hours of classroom meeting time for a three-credit course. Courses on a Tuesday/Thursday schedule will meet 28 times for 75 minutes, and for a final examination, again providing 44 hours of classroom meeting time. Courses that are scheduled to meet once each week for 150 minutes of instruction (not including breaks) and a final examination also provide 44 hours. If other formats are used, the equivalent amount of classroom instructional time should be provided. The amount of classroom instructional time should be prorated for varying numbers of credits. When a specific class in a course is cancelled for any reason - for example, for the closing of the University due to inclement weather or the illness or for unavailability of the faculty member then either the class time will be held at an alternative time, will meet using electronic modalities like videotaping of the instruction, or use additional structured instructional activities to meet the equivalency standard. Whenever possible, these contingencies should be explained in the syllabus, approved by the department chair, and documented accordingly.

II.  Alternative Formats

There are a number of outcomes-based formats at the University in which classroom instructional time is less than the 14 hours per one semester credit, but meet the equivalency standard set forth in these regulations and guidelines. With alternative formats, the classroom instructional time and the additional structured instructional activities must provide the equivalent learning time. For example, a seven-week, three-credit course meeting for four hours once each week for 28 hours of classroom instruction would have additional and integrated 16 hours of structured instructional activities to meet the standard; a one-week class that meets for 7 hours for 5 days would be 35 hours of classroom instruction and integrated 9 hours of structured instructional activities to meet the standard; or a three-week course meeting three times each week for a total of nine class meetings for 4 hours each class would meet for 36 hours of classroom instruction and have additional and integrated 8 hours of appropriate structured instructional activities; or completely online courses would require 44 hours of appropriate structured instructional activities to meet the minimum threshold; and hybrid or other variations of course format would mix classroom instructional time with appropriate instructional activities. The syllabus for all courses should clearly indicate the total amount of classroom instructional time and the other structured instructional activities utilized in the course.

III.  Supervised Group Activities

Some courses or parts of courses are scheduled and include group activities that include active learning but not direct faculty instruction. These include, for example, laboratory courses or sections, travel and service-learning, and supervised clinical experiences, among others. In these cases, a semester credit hour is awarded for the equivalent of fourteen hours of such activity, which is typically either two or three hours of the supervised group activity for the equivalent of one hour of classroom instructional time. That would mean a three credit supervised group activity would meet for or involve 84 to 126 hours. Some examples include a science laboratory that meets two or three hours each week of the semester for the equivalent of one credit, 12 hours of supervised clinical experience in a hospital each week as the equivalent of 4 credit hours, or a foreign travel course that may meet for three regular class meetings prior to and after for 6 hours and then have supervised group travel activities for 12 hours each day for 9 days or 108 more hours (the same as 36 regular classroom hours) for the equivalent of 3 credits. In these types of experiences, credits are not awarded based on the number of hours only, but also on fulfilling the objectives and/or obtaining the required competencies as set by the academic department.

IV.  Full-time Experiential Learning (student teaching, practicum)

Some major programs require that a student’s academic activity for a semester be essentially full- time in a hospital, school, or business setting. Examples include clinical rotations, student teaching, internships, and other such experiential learning experiences. On-site supervision is typically provided by employees of the host organization in communication with a Saint Francis University faculty supervisor. Students in these settings spend the fifteen weeks of the semester full-time in the setting, as defined by the host institution. That might mean 35-45 hours each week, depending on the host organization, for the equivalent of 15-18 credits earned. Activities for fewer credits require a pro-rated number of experiential hours, or about 3 hours for each of 14 weeks in the experiential setting for the equivalent of 1 credit hour. In these types of experiences, credits are not awarded based on the number of hours only, but also on fulfilling the objectives and/or obtains the required competencies as set by the academic department.

V.  Supervised individual activity (independent study, individual studio, tutorial)

At points in their collegiate career, students may have the opportunity to earn credit for supervised individual activities. Examples include independent study (defined as study given initial guidance, criticism, review and final evaluation of student performance by a faculty member); tutorial study (defined as study which is given initial faculty guidance followed by repeated, regularly scheduled individual student conferences with a faculty member, and periodic as well as final evaluation of student performance); and music lessons or art studio. Credit is awarded based on the amount of student academic activity. For example, for an independent study students may spend three hours, a tutorial three hours (including for example one hour with the faculty member) of learning activity, and music or art activity three hours total and 30 minutes with the faculty member for the equivalent of one hour of regular instructional learning. In these types of experiences, credits are not awarded based on the number of hours only, but also on fulfilling the objectives and/or obtains the required competencies as set by the academic department.

VI.  Instructional Related Learning Activities

There are many instructional related or student learning activities that can be utilized to achieve learning goals and provide the equivalent of the 14 hours per credit of regular classroom-based instruction. Choosing the particular combination of learning activities and methods is the responsibility of the faculty and academic department in terms of achieving the stated goals, objectives, and outcomes of the course, enhancing cooperative and collaborative learning in an instructor mediated environment, demonstrating an awareness of various learning styles and experiences of the students, and in the determining of equivalency to a semester of credit. The following examples are some, but by no means all, of the options that may be considered for utilization:

Discussion board structured to provide guided or instructor-mediated threaded discussion with specified timeframes and expectations for participation;

Chat rooms for class or group projects that provide opportunities for collaborative learning and that have specific expectations for participation and instructor feedback;

Case studies and problem solving scenarios relative to course goals and objectives and utilizing higher order analytical skills with peer and instructor feedback;

Blogs, journals, or logs in which students share the most relevant aspects with instructor and classmates review and feedback;

Internet search activities or library research in which instructor directs students to locate certain information or resources, relate them to course objectives, and share with classmates. This includes instructor review and feedback;

Library or research skill instruction provided by a resource or content librarian relevant to the particular class;

Lecture materials, including instructional materials like CDs or videos, written notes, videotaped lessons, or audio recordings that students view or read, and then develop questions, comments, or observations that are shared with classmates, and reviewed by the instructor through discussion board postings, journals, or participation in chat rooms;

Help sessions where the faculty member reviews materials for students who choose to attend.

“Snow Day” activities that are prepared, hidden on Blackboard, and then available for students should a class be cancelled with little notice. Again, it should include student interaction, and/or instructor review.

Field trips or tours in which students may participate as an individual or group in analyzing an activity (concert, museum, art exhibit, religious service, political debate, theatrical performance, etc.) and prepare a paper or presentation that is shared with classmates and reviewed and given feedback by the instructor;

Group projects based on learning objectives where students collaborate live or electronically by e-mail, chat rooms, and/or discussion boards, to research, analyze, synthesize, and prepare projects with instructor receiving periodic updates and providing guidance and feedback to the group;

Group simulation, role-playing, problem-based, and other learning activities that may continue throughout part or all of the semester that involves student interaction, and instructor review and feedback.

Attendance at and participation in prescribed campus events that are relevant to the course objectives, including student reflection and instructor review. 

Instructors should establish and control learning based interactions (when, where and why), including frequency, duration, evaluation, and assessment techniques. These guidelines recognize the need for the faculty to actively manage the learning space, whether inside or outside the traditional classroom.

In order to ensure consistency for students and faculty in meeting regulatory requirements and learning objectives, Saint Francis University has developed a rubric of suggested equivalencies to hours of classroom instruction for various online and out of classroom instructor mediated activities in the various formats. That rubric is available from the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

VII.  General Criteria for Credit Hour Equivalencies

For any activities or methodologies that are designed to be equivalent to regular classroom based instruction, the equivalent content should:

Be related directly to the objectives of the course/program

Be measureable for grading purposes

Have direct oversight or supervision of the faculty member teaching the course

Have opportunities for students to interact under the guidance of the faculty member

Be equivalent of an activity conducted in the classroom

Routine assignments may not be used as equivalent content because they are part of student responsibilities outside of regular instructional activity.

VIII.  Faculty Support

The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning provides a variety of professional development workshops and individual consultation opportunities for faculty to assist in the design, development, and effective utilization of appropriate instructional options and activities.

IX.  Review and Approval of Courses

When new courses are proposed to the Curriculum Committee and the Faculty Senate, each will be reviewed to be in conformity with these policy statements.

X.  Student Expectations

Also mentioned in various guidelines and regulations are expectations for students outside of classroom activities, or beyond those activities designed to be equivalent to regular classroom learning. Most of the suggestions are that students should spend at least two hours studying, reading, and working with course materials outside of the in-class or equivalent learning experiences. That would mean approximately 30 hours studying each week for a student with semester load of 15 credits, or six hours each week out of class each week involved in course material for a three-credit course.